Shunned Oldbury man fears tattooed youngsters will struggle for work

Tattooed David Bruce.

Tattooed David Bruce.

First published in Local

AN OLDBURY man with 80 tattoos, has become a tattoo artist after being shunned by a succession of employers due to his appearance.

Retail worker, David Bruce, 22, fears other tattooed youngsters will be also stigmatised after he was forced to leave his job in retail after being told he was unsuitable for the shop floor.

The trained artist, finished college to pursue employment in 2008. However, attitudes changed when he went from having no tattoos, to 80 in two years.

Bad comments and strange glances from customers meant Mr Bruce was removed from the shopfloor into the stockrooms, so that he would be out of sight.

Mr Bruce said: “I had nothing but hassle from management because the tattoos didn’t match the working environment and I was forced to cover them. When I got more, I was completely removed from the shop-floor and put into the stockroom out of view of the customers.”

Mr Bruce fears he, and other tattooed members of his generation, may now have restricted himself in the employment market.

He said: “When I started looking for jobs, I had a problem finding people that would take on tattooed people. I then looked into setting up my own business so that I would be self-employed to save anyone judging me at job interviews.

“I am comfortable because I’m in an artist working environment, so people can appreciate the tattoos.”

He also said: “I can understand why my prospects aren't going to be good because of the tattoos but the problem is that the media have portrayed young people in a demeaning manner, which means more companies are less likely to employ young workers."

Comments (1)

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7:54am Sat 24 Mar 12

Linebacker II says...

Yes, this craze for acquiring a jumble of tattoos is one of the more regrettable affectations of modern times - in particular, amongst women, some of whom so plaster their bodies with them that they resemble distinctly unfeminine bog-house walls.

In fact, it would be comical to witness the way some of these young ladies parade about in skimpy clothes - even on the coldest of days - purely in order to show off their latest piece of strategically-locate
d ink-stabbing were it not for the thought that in later life they too, like David, may come to deeply regret that trip to the tattoo salon.

To be sure, fashions will come and go - unlike that gaudy great dragon indelibly etched up the left thigh or those esoteric Chinese characters embossed around the neck (egg yuk sung?) - and I suspect that in a few years time there may be roaring trade going in tattoo removal, especially once age and sagginess set in and that little devil branded onto a quivering left bosom has been stretched to leave behind just a blurry, indistinct shape (as many a wizened old soldier or sailor who acquired their particular tattoos during National Service can readily attest).

Now that almost everyone under thirty seems to have one, and the novelty factor is consequently long gone, I sincerely hope that up-and-coming generations will shun this horrible, narcissistic fad and that men will instead be content to announce their footballing loyalties with a T-shirt, or the burgeoning brood of offspring they have sired with a photograph in their wallets.

Moreover, that if a woman really does feel the compulsion to possess a piece of body art reminding herself of her sexual charms then she will confine it to something discreet etched in a place where only her husband will find it!
Yes, this craze for acquiring a jumble of tattoos is one of the more regrettable affectations of modern times - in particular, amongst women, some of whom so plaster their bodies with them that they resemble distinctly unfeminine bog-house walls. In fact, it would be comical to witness the way some of these young ladies parade about in skimpy clothes - even on the coldest of days - purely in order to show off their latest piece of strategically-locate d ink-stabbing were it not for the thought that in later life they too, like David, may come to deeply regret that trip to the tattoo salon. To be sure, fashions will come and go - unlike that gaudy great dragon indelibly etched up the left thigh or those esoteric Chinese characters embossed around the neck (egg yuk sung?) - and I suspect that in a few years time there may be roaring trade going in tattoo removal, especially once age and sagginess set in and that little devil branded onto a quivering left bosom has been stretched to leave behind just a blurry, indistinct shape (as many a wizened old soldier or sailor who acquired their particular tattoos during National Service can readily attest). Now that almost everyone under thirty seems to have one, and the novelty factor is consequently long gone, I sincerely hope that up-and-coming generations will shun this horrible, narcissistic fad and that men will instead be content to announce their footballing loyalties with a T-shirt, or the burgeoning brood of offspring they have sired with a photograph in their wallets. Moreover, that if a woman really does feel the compulsion to possess a piece of body art reminding herself of her sexual charms then she will confine it to something discreet etched in a place where only her husband will find it! Linebacker II
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