Many Brits can be particular when it comes to their property and this is often the case when it comes to fences.

Leaning items on a fence can quickly escalate into a full-blown feud, tearing neighbourhoods apart.

However, very few actually know what the law says about this, making the area all the more confusing.

How do I know what garden fence is mine?

Halesowen News: It is important to determine if the fence is yours before taking action (Getty)It is important to determine if the fence is yours before taking action (Getty) (Image: Getty)

The law around who is responsible for what fence can be complicated with Compare the Market stating that residents can determine this by looking for a 'T' on the boundary. If this is on your side, you are responsible for the fence.

Alternatively, residents can also check the deeds and title plan of their property which set out legal ownership and the general position of boundaries on a map.

Another clue is if the "good side" of the fence faces into your garden.

If you still have no clear answer and no information is provided in the property's paperwork, residents can also contact the solicitors who carried out the conveyance work or contact the Land Registry or Registers of Scotland.

Can my neighbour lean things against my fence?

Halesowen News: Your neighbour has no legal right to lean items against your fence in most cases (Getty)Your neighbour has no legal right to lean items against your fence in most cases (Getty) (Image: Getty)

According to Land Registry Online, it is generally the case that your neighbour has no right to lean things on your fence without your permission as this is your property.

However, there are a number of exceptions to this rule with neighbours allowed to lean things against your fence if it is in a state of disrepair in order to prop it up.

What should I do if my neighbour keeps leaning things on my fence?

Land Registry Online states that ensuring your fence is in good condition is one way to make sure your neighbour has no reason to be leaning things on it.

It is advised that you politely talk with your neighbour before following up with a letter.

Residents can then try and resolve the issue through a third-party mediator or solicitor before considering any legal action.